Porn-Free Luxury Hotel Profits from Moral Decision

Yahoo! News

Kim Linton Kim Linton
Mon Jan 31, 6:48 pm ET

In 1999, Dallas-based Omni Hotels decided to eliminate all porn and adult entertainment from their in-room TV systems. Since making the decision to pull porn from their rooms, Omni has tapped into the lucrative religious market, hosting annual conventions and mega-events for large ministries like evangelist Billy Graham and TD Jakes.

Omni spokeswoman Caryn Kboudi told USA Today, “It was a moral decision. It had nothing to do with changing in-room-entertainment platforms or declining movie-rental sales related to an uptick in the number of travelers who carry their own entertainment.” Kboudi also said the large hotel chain never advertised its porn-free position, “We didn’t want to create a marketing message around this. This is just who we are.”

Following in Omni’s footsteps, another large hotel chain has decided to stop offering in-room porn. Marriott International’s decision comes after years of discussing whether allowing adult films in guest rooms is appropriate, and whether safeguards exist to prevent children from watching it. As for profit margins, Marriott says entertainment options like Netflix, Slingbox and laptops have reduced hotel revenues from in-room movies and adult content.

Are porn-free hotels the new industry standard?

Pornography has always been the ugly stepchild of the entertainment industry, especially when offered in family venues like hotels. Christian groups like Focus on the Family and websites like CleanHotels.com have fought hard to encourage hotel chains and industry leaders to ban adult movies in their facilities.

While technology trends like free Internet porn and digital movies have an impact on the profitability of adult entertainment systems in hotel rooms, morality is at the core of the in-room porn debate. Even without religion in the mix, the issue of children having access to porn (in a hotel room) is still a problem most hotel owners would rather not face.

Omni’s decision to remove porn from their in-room entertainment system was an easy one — they made the decision based strictly on moral issues. Other hotel giants, like Marriott, may have a harder time making the same decision. However, the increasing availability of free pornography on the Internet may be the excuse hotel industry leaders have been waiting for.

Kim Linton began her writing career in 2001 as a contributor for Ministrymaker.com, a Christian ministry webzine. Kim’s work has since been published on a variety of websites including Woman’s Day and Intel, and featured on several news sites including USA Today and The Wall Street Journal.

Website source: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ac/20110131/us_ac/7748706_pornfree_luxury_hotel_profits_from_moral_decision